Conference workshops

Core Workshop

Hovik Matevossian1 , Dimitrios Vlachos2

1Russian Academy of Sciences, Federal Research Center "Computer Science and Control", Russian Federation
2University of Peloponnese, Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, Greece

Description

This Workshop contains all the submissions that have not been assigned in other specific Workshops. Upon the finalization of the Technical Program, submissions in the Core Workshop will be assigned to Presentation Slots according to their subject.


Mathematical Theory of Capillarity

Robert Finn1

1Stanford University, Mathematics, United States

Description

The modern theory of capillarity originated in achievements of Laplace in 1806, based on insights introduced by Thomas Young in 1805. There followed a single definitive work of Gauss in 1830, and then an interlude of well over a century, during which the topic received little attention. In contemporary times, the demands of space exploration and also of medicine, of biology and of industrial procedures have been inspiring new developments of varying character. These have been appearing in frequently uncoordinated ways and often in ignorance of related developments from other sources. We note recent announcements of active interest, appearing in journals as disparate in their structures and goals as the J. Am. Chem. Soc., Physics of Fluids, and J. reine angew. Math. Much is now happening, independent new insights are emerging, and a new and broader theory will certainly ensue. The venue of this conference can be expected to be instrumental in that development and to offer opportunities for cooperation among investigators with varying backgrounds and points of view. To that effect we intend to invite explicitly to this Workshop major contributors from all fields, who are known to us. We emphasize additionally that we welcome unaccustomed insights, and we thus encourage others who may wish to speak to send summaries of the material to rfinn@stanford.edu for consideration, based on its perceived relevance and interest for the topic.


Analysis and Operator Theory

Hovik Matevossian1

1Russian Academy of Sciences, Federal Research Center "Computer Science and Control", Russian Federation

Description

Analysis and Operator Theory


Modeling in Physics and Nonlinear Dynamics

Hovik Matevossian1

1Russian Academy of Sciences, Federal Research Center "Computer Science and Control", Russian Federation

Description

Dynamic systems and Ordinary Differential Equations


Mathematical Physics and PDE

Hovik Matevossian1

1Russian Academy of Sciences, Federal Research Center "Computer Science and Control", Russian Federation

Description

Mathematical Physics and PDE


Homogenization and Composite Materials

Hovik Matevossian1

1Russian Academy of Sciences, Federal Research Center "Computer Science and Control", Russian Federation

Description

Applied Mathematics and Composite Materials


Modeling in Applied and Fundamental Physics

Hovik Matevossian1

1Russian Academy of Sciences, Federal Research Center "Computer Science and Control", Russian Federation

Description

Modeling in Physical Sciences


Modeling in Applied Problems of Mechanics and Solid Mechanics

Hovik Matevossian1

1Russian Academy of Sciences, Federal Research Center "Computer Science and Control", Russian Federation

Description

Mathematical Modeling in Science and Technology


Numerical Analysis, Scientific Computing and Computer Science

Hovik Matevossian1

1Russian Academy of Sciences, Federal Research Center "Computer Science and Control", Russian Federation

Description

Mathematical Aspects of Computer Science


Mathematical Modeling in Biology, Medicine and Technology

Hovik Matevossian1

1Russian Academy of Sciences, Federal Research Center "Computer Science and Control", Russian Federation

Description

Expectations from modern medicine are very high and this makes this field very demanding as far as the questions posed and the needed solutions are concerned, related to early diagnosis, effective therapy, accurate intervention, real time monitoring, procedures/systems/instruments optimization, error reduction and knowledge extraction. In parallel, following the explosive production of biological data concerning DNA, RNA and protein biomolecules, a plethora of questions has been raised regarding their structure, their function, the interactions between them, their relationships and their dependencies, their regulation and expression, their location and their thermodynamic characteristics. Furthermore, the interplay between medicine and biology leads to fields like molecular medicine and systems biology which are further interconnected with physics, mathematics, informatics and engineering creating new islands in the ocean of scientific interconnections like medical physics and biophysics, medical informatics, bioinformatics and computational biology, nanobiotechnology and astrobiology. We hope that this workshop will host exciting questions and intelligent algorithmic solutions in these interdisciplinary fields of medicine and biology bringing together scientists from different research fields into a creative and fertile scientific knowledge interchange.


Modeling in Ecology, Economics and Social Sciences

Hovik Matevossian1

1Russian Academy of Sciences, Federal Research Center "Computer Science and Control", Russian Federation

Description

Owing to masses of digital real-world data it is now possible to create and validate models of human behaviour. Of special interest are human activities connected to use of Internet - their habits, movements or likings. Simple models, basing on fundamental physical laws and phenomena can be of instant use in this case. The Workshop is also open to new techniques connected to data mining and statistics that can facilitate the process of models' input preparation as well as help to discover new non-trivial phenomena.


Complex systems and Complex Networks

Dimitrios Vlachos1

1University of Peloponnese, Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, Greece

Description

This workshop will focus on topics of complexity with special emphasis on complex networks and multiplex networks. Complex networks are studied in many diverse fields, such as mathematics, physics, biology, sociology, economics, and computer science. In recent years, the field has seen a tremendous growth. The session will focus on recent advances in the field and will include both theoretical and applied research in complex systems. Particular emphasis will be given to the interdisciplinary nature of complex networks. A wide range of topics will be covered, such as network structure and dynamics on networks, coupled networks, spreading, synchronization, visualization, algorithms, large-scale data analysis, as well as networks of interest to biology, sociology, computer science, economics, medicine, linguistics, etc.


Geometric integration in physical sciences and engineering

Dimitrios Vlachos1

1University of Peloponnese, Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, Greece

Description

Many differential equations, which are of interest in the physical sciences and engineering, exhibit geometric properties that are preserved by the dynamics. Discrete Lagrangian integrators, as a special type of geometric integration, has been recent interest in developing numerical schemes that preserve as many of these geometric invariants as possible. Such methods are of particular interest for problems that can be described by geometric mechanics, wherein the preservation of physical invariants such as the energy, momentum, and symplectic form can be important when simulating long-time dynamics of such systems. The aim of the session is to bring together researchers in mathematics, computer science, physical sciences, and engineering, who are interested in the broad area of numerical methods (for ordinary differential equations to partial differential equations) that preserve the underlying structure of the governing differential equations.


Computational Nanoscience and Material Science

Dimitrios Vlachos1

1University of Peloponnese, Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, Greece

Description

Computational nanoscience in particular and Computational Material Science in general, are rapidly developing fields providing computer simulational and theoretical background for understanding of nanoscale phenomena and nanotechnology research. Computational nanoscience overarches the whole spectrum of science including biology, physics, engineering, material science and chemistry, describing the behaviour of matter at the scale of individual atoms and molecules. This session will concentrate on novel computational approaches used in nanoscale research, including: Quantum Monte Carlo, Molecular Dynamics, Density Functional Theory, Time-Dependent Quantum Dynamics Simulations, Interaction of Nanoscale Materials and Laser Fields, Quantum Transport in Nanoscale Materials, Multiscale Modeling of Nanoscale Materials, Novel Computational Approaches, Electronic Structure Calculations and Attoscale Dynamics.